Antitrust Lawyer Blog Commentary on Current Developments

FCC Chairman’s View On Broadband Competition

In a September 4, 2014 speech, Federal Communications Commission (“FCC”) Chairman Tom Wheeler expressed concerns about the lack of broadband competition in the United States.

Chairman Wheeler explained that access to a 25 Mbps connection is becoming essential (or “table stakes”) to consumers with a majority of Americans having access to 100 Mbps or higher connections. However, “just because most Americans have access to next-generation broadband doesn’t mean they have competitive choices.”  Indeed, Chairman Wheeler believes that most Americans really have no competitive choices.  Chairman Wheeler applauded Google and AT&T’s introductions and plans to introduce gigabit broadband to markets around the country, but worried that characterizing competition in many markets as a duopoly “overstates the case” because of the lack of competitive opportunities open to consumers.

To address these concerns, Chairman Wheeler explained the FCC’s Agenda for Broadband Competition, which includes four broad principles: (i) protect existing competition; (ii) encourage greater competition where possible; (ii) create competition where it does not exist in a meaningful way; and (iv) promote broadband deployment where competition cannot be expected to exist.  Through the application of these principles, Chairman Wheeler hopes to improve broadband performance, promote competition, and encourage innovation.

For more information see: Tom Wheeler, Chairman, Federal Communications Commission, The Facts and Future of Broadband Competition, (Sept. 4, 2014), available at http://transition.fcc.gov/Daily_Releases/Daily_Business/2014/db0904/DOC-329161A1.pdf.

Andre Barlow
(202) 589-1838
abarlow@dbmlawgroup.com