Antitrust Lawyer Blog Commentary on Current Developments

Articles Tagged with FCC

On November 10, 2014, President Obama forcefully stated his position on net neutrality.  While acknowledging that the FCC is the agency that has the authority to create new rules protecting net neutrality, President Obama stated that the FCC should create “the strongest possible rules” to stop “paid prioritization” and other actions that favor the transmission of certain content.  President Obama believes all content providers should be treated equally.  Therefore, he is not in favor of the deals that Netflix cut with Comcast, Verizon, AT&T and Time Warner Cable earlier this year.  Indeed, President Obama does not believe that the cable company or phone company should act as a gatekeeper.

President Obama lists four bright-line rules:

  • No blocking. If a consumer requests access to a website or service, and the content is legal, your ISP should not be permitted to block it. That way, every player — not just those commercially affiliated with an ISP — gets a fair shot at your business.

On September 17, the Senate Judiciary Committee held a hearing — “Why Net Neutrality Matters: Protecting Consumers and Competition Through Meaningful Open Internet Rules.”  The witnesses were:

·            Brad Burnham – Managing Partner, Union Square Ventures

·            Ruth Livier – Writer, Independent Producer, and Actress

In a September 4, 2014 speech, Federal Communications Commission (“FCC”) Chairman Tom Wheeler expressed concerns about the lack of broadband competition in the United States.

Chairman Wheeler explained that access to a 25 Mbps connection is becoming essential (or “table stakes”) to consumers with a majority of Americans having access to 100 Mbps or higher connections. However, “just because most Americans have access to next-generation broadband doesn’t mean they have competitive choices.”  Indeed, Chairman Wheeler believes that most Americans really have no competitive choices.  Chairman Wheeler applauded Google and AT&T’s introductions and plans to introduce gigabit broadband to markets around the country, but worried that characterizing competition in many markets as a duopoly “overstates the case” because of the lack of competitive opportunities open to consumers.

To address these concerns, Chairman Wheeler explained the FCC’s Agenda for Broadband Competition, which includes four broad principles: (i) protect existing competition; (ii) encourage greater competition where possible; (ii) create competition where it does not exist in a meaningful way; and (iv) promote broadband deployment where competition cannot be expected to exist.  Through the application of these principles, Chairman Wheeler hopes to improve broadband performance, promote competition, and encourage innovation.

On September 3, 2014, the FCC announced it reached a settlement with Verizon for $7.4 million.

The settlement ending an investigating into Verizon’s alleged misuse of customer information. The FCC’s Enforcement Bureau was investigating Verizon’s alleged failure to notify approximately two million new customers of their privacy rights.  Specifically, Verizon allegedly failed to provide to  new customers instructions for how to opt-out from alleged Verizon’s use of their personal information for marketing purposes.  As part of the settlement, Verizon must inform all new customers of their opt-out rights on every bill for three years.

The $7.4 million settlement is the largest in FCC history for a settlement of an investigation related solely to the privacy of telephone customers’ personal information.